Tag archives for motor trend

Motor Trend tests Tesla Model S, finds 0-60 in 3.9 sec and 100.7 MPGe

2012 Tesla Model S - front three-quarter dynamic motion shot



Tesla has said the highest-end Model S has a range of 300 miles (at 55 miles per hour), but until recently, it’s been tremendously difficult for anyone outside the company to verify this number. When the EPA did its testing thing, it came up with a 265-mile range estimate for the version with the 85-kWh battery pack. Tesla is even offering a prize of some sort to anyone who drives a Model S over 400 miles on one charge.



Now, Motor Trend writers has had the chance to spend some time in Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s personal Performance Signature Model S to see just how far the electric car can be driven. The result? Your results may vary.



First, the good news. Motor Trend ran a battery of tests on the Model S, and its independent measurements discovered the following ways that their independent testing beat the manufacturer’s official numbers:

  • 0-60 time: 3.9 seconds (Tesla official number is 4.4 seconds)
  • Quarter mile: 12.5 seconds at 110.9 mph (12.6 seconds)
  • 100.7 MPGe during a 200+ mile drive (EPA says 89 MPGe).

So, then, what’s the bad news? At roughly 65 mph with no A/C, MT “only” got 238 miles out of the battery. That’s less than advertised, but MT offers an important and reasonable take on this issue:

But the range that matters is really a psychological/perceptual one, not a specific number. Think about it: We drove from Fontana on the eastern edge of the L.A. basin to San Diego and all the way back to L.A.’s Pacific edge on one charge. Five hours of continuous driving. This is a breakthrough accomplishment that ought to knock down the range anxiety barrier that’s substantially limited EV sales.

Word.

Related GalleryTesla Model S

Tesla Model Stesla model sTesla Model STesla Model STesla Model STesla Model STesla Model STesla Model S

By Sebastian Blanco

Motor Trend suggests Tesla Model S may be most important new car since Ford Model T

2013 Tesla Model S in silver - front three-quarter view. Motor Trend Ignition video screencap.



“It may very well be the most important new car since the Model T.”



That’s the summation of the latest video from Motor Trend and its Ignition video series, speaking of the Tesla Model S. Though the buff site had previously released a video featuring a range-testing excursion from LA-to-Vegas (and back), this time its cameras were out to capture whether it proves its worth as a car.



For MT’s Carlos Lago, the criteria involved in the equation includes important things like, “How fast is it, how fun is it to drive.” And while he does spend some tire-smoking time testing the five-door hatchback’s performance parameters, the approach overall is more holistic than some we’ve seen.



Adding up the performance, style, technology and price, Lago compares the Tesla favorably with the Mercedes-Benz E63 AMG and Porsche Panamera. He says it feels “like car 3.0.” It all kind of gives us hope our favorite fastback will come out on top when MT reveals its Car Of The Year sometime in November.



Scroll down to watch one of the best-looking Model S video reviews to date, and let us know in Comments if you agree with its conclusions.





By Domenick Yoney

Motor Trend giving away Tesla Model S…. sorta

Motor Trend's



Our initial response to Motor Trend saying it was “giving away” a Tesla Model S, was “we’ll take it.” Alas, it’s only a simulated version.



The publication, which last November named the all-electric luxury sedan its Car of the Year, is hooking up with social-networking game Car Town by offering to “give” a (theoretical) Model S to game players who want to win fake races and score fake dates in the process. Hey, the 50 million people who play Car Town on Facebook can’t be wrong. If this sounds like something you’d be into, go here to sign up for the contest.



Meantime, back in the real world, Tesla said last week that the company has ramped up to full production capacity of 400 Model S vehicles a week and delivered about 2,400 Model S vehicles during the fourth quarter. Those sales were about equal with the Ford C-Max Energi Plug-in Hybrid and trailed only the Chevrolet Volt, Toyota Prius Plug-in and Nissan Leaf among US plug-in vehicle sales.

By Danny King

2013 Motor Trend Car of the Year: Tesla Model S [w/video]

2012 Tesla Model S



Eleven cars enter, one car leaves. Silently and with zero emissions.



Tesla has earned one of the most coveted prizes in the automotive world, as its Model S has taken home the Golden Calipers as the 2013 Motor Trend Car of the Year. In the process, the Model S beat out a field that included 10 other contenders.



In case you were wondering, this is the first time an electric car has earned this accolade. No internal combustion here, folks. In an impressive run the Model S was also named Automobile Car of the Year and one of the 25 Best Inventions of the year by Time Magazine.



Motor Trend’s very own Angus MacKenzie calls the Model S “perhaps the most accomplished all-new luxury car since the original Lexus LS 400.” High praise indeed, considering how Toyota’s luxury division ruffled feathers in challenging Germany Inc. way back in 1989. MacKenzie goes on: “At its core, the Tesla Model S is simply a damned good car you happen to plug in to refuel.”



Two aspects of the Tesla Model S that weighed heavily on Motor Trend staffers were performance and efficiency. With maximum horsepower sitting at 416 and torque an astounding 443 pound-feet – resulting in a dash to 60 in just 4.0 seconds and an average of 75.5 miles per gallon equivalent during MT’s testing – this all-American electric sedan is worthy of accolades.



Somewhat shockingly, every single judge for Motor Trend picked the Tesla Model S as their winner, causing MacKenzie to sum up the pick this way: “America can still make things. Great things.” Indeed. Read the official details from Motor Trend here, and scroll down below for a video.

Related Gallery2012 Tesla Model S: First Drive

2012 Tesla Model S2012 Tesla Model S2012 Tesla Model S2012 Tesla Model S2012 Tesla Model S2012 Tesla Model S2012 Tesla Model S2012 Tesla Model S


By Jeremy Korzeniewski

At Tesla’s Party, Superchargers and Delivery Dates

Elon Musk, Tesla's founder and chief executive.Jim Motavalli Elon Musk, Tesla’s founder and chief executive.

The Tesla Motors party in Manhattan on Monday night was loud and crowded with company supporters and would-be owners. The reason for the gathering was initially left mysterious, but a loud partisan cheer went up in the room when it was announced that the Model S sedan had been chosen as Motor Trend’s 2013 Car of the Year. Earlier in the month, Automobile magazine named the car its Automobile of the Year.

There was other news to be had around the edges of the Tesla gathering. The company has already unveiled its California network of 480-volt “Superchargers,” but Christina Ra, a company spokeswoman, said Tesla would soon announce a similar Boston-to-Washington corridor, with the first station to be opened in Milford, Conn., “in the coming weeks.” In a meeting with editors of The New York Times on Tuesday, Tesla’s founder and chief executive, Elon Musk, and George Blankenship, the vice president for worldwide sales and ownership experience, said another station was planned for Wilmington, Del.

In a news conference at the Monday evening event, Mr. Musk said of the Supercharger networks, “We expect all of the United States to be covered by the end of next year.” He also promised “three hours of driving for half an hour of charging,” and said that Tesla owners’ use of the network would be free “not for a little while, but forever.”

It is unclear just how many Model S cars have been delivered to customers. In its third-quarter shareholder letter this month, Tesla said it had delivered “over 250 Model S sedans.” Asked to clarify at the event, Mr. Musk said, “Substantially more than 250.”

…continue reading

Motor Trend tests Tesla Model S, finds 0-60 in 3.9 sec and 100.7 MPGe

2012 Tesla Model S - front three-quarter dynamic motion shot



Tesla has said the highest-end Model S has a range of 300 miles (at 55 miles per hour), but until recently, it’s been tremendously difficult for anyone outside the company to verify this number. When the EPA did its testing thing, it came up with a 265-mile range estimate for the version with the 85-kWh battery pack. Tesla is even offering a prize of some sort to anyone who drives a Model S over 400 miles on one charge.



Now, Motor Trend writers has had the chance to spend some time in Tesla CEO Elon Musk’s personal Performance Signature Model S to see just how far the electric car can be driven. The result? Your results may vary.



First, the good news. Motor Trend ran a battery of tests on the Model S, and its independent measurements discovered the following ways that their independent testing beat the manufacturer’s official numbers:

  • 0-60 time: 3.9 seconds (Tesla official number is 4.4 seconds)
  • Quarter mile: 12.5 seconds at 110.9 mph (12.6 seconds)
  • 100.7 MPGe during a 200+ mile drive (EPA says 89 MPGe).

So, then, what’s the bad news? At roughly 65 mph with no A/C, MT “only” got 238 miles out of the battery. That’s less than advertised, but MT offers an important and reasonable take on this issue:

“But the range that matters is really a psychological/perceptual one, not a specific number. Think about it: We drove from Fontana on the eastern edge of the L.A. basin to San Diego and all the way back to L.A.’s Pacific edge on one charge. Five hours of continuous driving. This is a breakthrough accomplishment that ought to knock down the range anxiety barrier that’s substantially limited EV sales.”

Word.

Related GalleryTesla Model S

Tesla Model Stesla model sTesla Model STesla Model STesla Model STesla Model STesla Model STesla Model S

By Sebastian Blanco

MT attempts no-recharge LA-to-Las Vegas drive in Tesla Model S





Some would say these Motor Trend editors hit the jackpot before and after they hit Vegas.



With a three-day loan of a Tesla Model S, the magazine’s editors were given the opportunity to drive from Los Angeles to San Diego, then later do a round trip from the LA area to Las Vegas and back.



The goal was to see if the all-electric luxury sedan delivered the EPA-estimated single-charge range of 265 miles and approached Tesla’s own estimates of a 300-mile single-charge range.



The results? For the 211-mile trip from the outskirts of Los Angeles to Las Vegas, the Model S was able to go the distance with a fair amount of charge to spare, and that included an elevation climb of about 4,000 feet, running part-way with the air-conditioning on and cruising at about 65 miles per hour.



For the return trip, an editor was able to make the 285-mile drive between Las Vegas and Motor Trend’s El Segundo, CA, offices with three miles to spare. Whew. That said, the editor kept the A/C off for most of the ride, cruised at speeds as low as 52 miles per hour on freeways, and hit slow traffic (which helps range) near the end of the drive.



Either way, it can be argued that the Model S came up aces. Had the car had trouble, there is an electric-vehicle charging station along the way in Victorville, CA – at a Nissan dealership. See below for the nearly nine-minute video from Motor Trend.

Related GalleryTesla Model S: Quick Spin





By Danny King